Improving lateral movement

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Winning more games with a better warmup

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The defensive stance: How do we improve lateral speed?

youth-basketball-drills

Does the coach (in white) in the above picture look like he is going to move quickly? Is you were asked to move as quickly as possible in any direction, would you choose this stance as your starting point? Read more

Lateral movement, basketball defense, and persistent myths

Last week, I attended a high-school varsity girls basketball game between good teams with college-bound players, and it was evident that the players had been taught never to cross their feet on defense. When I lamented this instruction via Twitter, several people questioned my lamentations. These questions spurred a few videos this week on defense, lateral movement, and the crossover step. For more information, check out Fake Fundamentals. Read more

The hip turn, drop step, and basketball defense

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Research into defense, plyometrics, and small-sided games in basketball

I read on an Internet forum that I “make up my own studies” and publish them. I decided to post the links to the papers from my made-up studies to allow anyone interested to find them easily. While admittedly not from the most authoritative journals in kinesiology and exercise science, these are published in peer-reviewed journals. Links to the papers and abstracts appear below. Read more

Lateral Movement – Mirror Drill

Coaches always want better ways to teach defense. To me, the Mirror Defense Drill is the best drill because it trains lateral movement and reactivity. In the drill below, the strength coaches demonstrate lateral movement with a rear-foot push-off as opposed to the basketball-specific step-slide. For lateral quickness, this is the best movement pattern to teach. Many basketball coaches are stuck in the old dogma and are unwilling to accept a rear-foot push-off or a crossover step because they teach defense in slow motion and from a static position.

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Defensive Footwork: The Mirror Drill

I write about (and use) the Mirror Defensive Drill frequently. Here is Michael Reid using one form of the Mirror Drill with his Swedish team.

Rather than have players stand in line, to end the drill, I toss the ball toward the other end for the players to chase; whoever gets the ball is on offense going to the other basket. Keeps the drill moving a little better.

H2G Vol.4 Front CoverOriginally published in Hard2Guard Player Development Newsletter, Volume 4.

For similar content, subscribe to the free weekly Hard2Guard Player Development Newsletter.

The High Set for Lateral Movement

As I have written previously, tennis movement and basketball movement are similar. A physical therapist sent me this video which examines the “high set” position and the Harvard University tennis team.

Now, basketball differs from tennis because of the presence of fakes and other aspects, so there is not a linear argument from tennis footwork to basketball footwork. However, they are related. If the high set works for tennis and improves movement economy and quickness in tennis, is the same true in basketball?

What is the best defensive position? Is it easy to move in a low stance? When I played, I spent hours at practices and camps with coaches yelling at us to sit lower in a stance. Did it make us better defensively? Did the lower position make us quicker?

The low set position is the norm in tennis. It is almost unthinkable to suggest otherwise, just as standard wisdom dictates an exaggeratedly low stance for defense in basketball. However, is that the most efficient stance? Does it produce the quickest movement?

H2G Vol.4 Front CoverOriginally published in Hard2Guard Player Development Newsletter, Volume 4.

For similar content, subscribe to the free weekly Hard2Guard Player Development Newsletter.

Lateral Movement Training for Basketball

Hard2Guard Player Development Newsletter 4.12 featured an interview with Stanford University’s men’s basketball strength & conditioning coach Keith D’Amelio. In the interview, he covers some drills that he uses to train lateral movement. Here are the videos:

1-2 Stick

1-2 Cut & Stick

1-2 Cut Continuous

H2G Vol.4 Front CoverOriginally published in Hard2Guard Player Development Newsletter, Volume 4.

For similar content, subscribe to the free weekly Hard2Guard Player Development Newsletter.

Next Page »

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  • The PBDL Concept

    English soccer academies wait until players are 11 to play full 11v11 soccer; in Italy, youth basketball players participate in skill-oriented clinics at 6-years-old, but start competitive games at 12. In the United States, kids play 5v5 full court games and compete for national championships when they are 8-years-old.

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