How to Tell a Winner from a Loser

by on January 21, 2012
in Talent Development

Note: I have had this file on my computer for over a decade. Not sure where it originated, but things for each team and player to think about.

  1. When a winner makes a mistake, he says “my fault”; when a loser makes a mistake, he throws the blame on someone else.
  2. A winner credits his “good luck” for winning on being fundamentally prepared; a loser blames his “bad luck” for losing on bad breaks even though he is not fundamentally prepared.
  3. A winner works harder than a loser and always finds time to do what is expected of him; a loser never finds the time and when he does, he works on the wrong things.
  4. A winner makes commitments and sets goals with his heart and sets out to accomplish them; a loser makes “promises” with his mouth and never sincerely means to keep them.
  5. A winner shows he’s sorry by making up for mistakes; a loser says “I’m sorry” but does the same thing next time.
  6. A winner thinks, “I’m good, but not as good as I should or could be.” A loser thinks, “I’m not as bad as some of the others.”
  7. A winner would rather be admired for his ability than liked, although he would prefer both; a loser would rather be liked than admired because he knows he hasn’t worked hard enough to be admired.
  8. A winner hates to lose; a loser could care less although he may put up a good front.
  9. A winner is fundamentally sound in all aspects of the game; a loser is not!
  10. A winner knows that strength, agility and quickness are the keys to success in athletics and works hard to attain those things; a loser may know, but never attains.
  11. A winner takes constructive criticism from the coach, realizing that it will help him and the team; a loser pouts and thinks he’s being picked on.
  12. A winner thinks of the team first and never wants to let the team down; a loser thinks of himself first and the team last.
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