What is a proper reaction to a loss?

One of the biggest criticisms of this generation is that they are immune to losing. Many attribute this flaw to the number of games that children play, as it makes any single game less important.  Read more

How to teach sportsmanship: A video-game example

In the August 2013 Wired, there is a small column about the League of Legends video game. I am not a gamer, but the article said that it is a multiplayer game. According to its developer, “toxic player behavior” became a reason for people quitting (Horvath, 2013).  Read more

Gamification: Where did youth sports go wrong?

In the talk below, author and entrepreneur Gabe Zichermann argues that real life moves too slowly for children raised in a video-game world. Rather than crying about the dreadful video games and their negative effects, we should embrace video games and the gamification of our society. Read more

Creating Engagement through Seven Principles of Video Games

Parents, coaches, and educators loathe video games for the very reason that makes video games successful: Video-game makers know how to engage children (and adults). They study the best ways to engage users and tweak games to make the games more engaging. Rather than complain about video games, educators, coaches, and league administrators should attempt to learn from the games, as I have written previously, because video games offer some positives for youth development. Read more

Video-game positives for youth development

Parents, teachers and coaches blame video games for most of society’s ills. This is lazy. Rather than blame video games, we should learn from video-game makers: Obviously, they are doing something right! Read more

Learning from Video Games to Increase Athletic Engagement

Note: Originally published in the December 2011 issue of Los Angeles Sports & Fitness.

In high school, we played so much basketball that we self-policed the student parking lot so we had courts to use during breaks, lunch and after school, which meant that late-arriving students parked out past a field rather than on the basketball courts next to classrooms. These days, courts often remain vacant during breaks, lunch and after school as this generation engages in different free-time activities. Read more

  • What Is A Playmaker?

    Who decided that a point guard has to be small? More importantly, what is a point guard? We expect a point guard to be a leader and have a high basketball I.Q. Why don’t we expect or challenge all players to develop this game awareness? Why rely on only one player? Read more →
  • The PBDL Concept

    English soccer academies wait until players are 11 to play full 11v11 soccer; in Italy, youth basketball players participate in skill-oriented clinics at 6-years-old, but start competitive games at 12. In the United States, kids play 5v5 full court games and compete for national championships when they are 8-years-old.

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  • Starting A PBDL

    The PBDL emphasizes learning and development. Presently, players and parents have numerous recreation options - leagues based on fun and equal participation, typically for beginners - and numerous competitive opportunities - teams focused on strategy, game preparation and winning. There are few true development leagues - until now.

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