The ultimate cliche: We need to play harder

With a two-goal lead, Southhampton had a corner kick against Everton. After a poor clearance, and a loose ball, Steven Davis crossed the ball from the left side outside the penalty area toward the center of the six-yard box. As the ball was crossed, Southhampton’s defender Maya Yoshida ran straight toward the goal, in between two defenders who did not see or react to him, and headed in the third goal in a 3-0 win. The television analyst’s lazy, cliched explanation for the goal was that Yoshida “wanted it more.”  Read more

Coaching Frosh Basketball – Week 3.5

Finals are finished, and we lost two more games. After reflecting on the first loss (I missed the second loss with a final), and the previous two games, we’re losing due to some little things. First, and foremost, my philosophy is hurting us right now. We lost to two teams that run the Flex and take advantage of the lack of a shot clock to run the offense over and over until a defender makes a mistake. Our offense is often disorganized. If we ran something like the Flex, we would probably fare better because players would know exactly what to do: pass, screen down, etc. I am more concerned with players learning to find spacing, learning to move in relation to the dribble, learning to run a pick-and-roll, etc. We have the outlines of an offense, but no true structure. This hurts us competitively right now because we have to learn to play with each other and read each other. It’s a process, and a slow learning process right now. Read more

  • What Is A Playmaker?

    Who decided that a point guard has to be small? More importantly, what is a point guard? We expect a point guard to be a leader and have a high basketball I.Q. Why don’t we expect or challenge all players to develop this game awareness? Why rely on only one player? Read more →
  • The PBDL Concept

    English soccer academies wait until players are 11 to play full 11v11 soccer; in Italy, youth basketball players participate in skill-oriented clinics at 6-years-old, but start competitive games at 12. In the United States, kids play 5v5 full court games and compete for national championships when they are 8-years-old.

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  • Starting A PBDL

    The PBDL emphasizes learning and development. Presently, players and parents have numerous recreation options - leagues based on fun and equal participation, typically for beginners - and numerous competitive opportunities - teams focused on strategy, game preparation and winning. There are few true development leagues - until now.

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