Rajon Rondo Shows “The Rondo” and the Euro-Step

Rajon Rondo demonstrating “The Rondo” against the Raptors:

Next, Rondo demonstrates the Euro-Step:

H2G Vol.4 Front CoverOriginally published in Hard2Guard Player Development Newsletter, Volume 4.

For similar content, subscribe to the free weekly Hard2Guard Player Development Newsletter.

Rajon Rondo’s Euro-Step

Hard2Guard Player Development Newsletter features a short article on the importance of finishing, and mentions the success of great and creative finishers like Rajon Rondo and Steve Nash in the 2010 NBA Play-offs.

Here is an example of Rondo using the Euro-Step against the Cavs:


H2G Vol.4 Front Cover

Originally published in Hard2Guard Player Development Newsletter, Volume 4.

For similar content, subscribe to the free weekly Hard2Guard Player Development Newsletter.

Tyreke Evans’ Game-Winning Euro-Step Move

The Sacramento Kings’ Tyreke Evans beat the Milwaukee Bucks with a game-winning lay-up around 7’0 center Andrew Bogut. The play started with a hand-off at the top which forced the switch. Then, Evans attacked the bigger player, putting Bogut on his heels.

The step-step move gained popularity with Manu Ginobili, and many people now teach it. However, Allen Iverson (and probably many other before him) used the move for years to get an angle to the basket and draw fouls.

As the player attacks with his right-hand dribble, he steps to his right to get the defender leaning in the direction and then steps past the defender with his left foot. In this instance, he finished with an inside-hand lay-up with his right hand.

If the defender does not react to the lateral step with the right foot, the player can step straight ahead with his left foot and finish with a right-hand lay-up. The move is especially effective in situations like these when the ball handler is attacking a back-pedaling defender or a defender waiting near the rim for the attacking player.

H2G Vol.4 Front CoverOriginally published in Hard2Guard Player Development Newsletter, Volume 4.

For similar content, subscribe to the free weekly Hard2Guard Player Development Newsletter.

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