My 2016 Reading List

In the tradition of lists from 2014 and 2015, here is my reading list for 2016.

The year started with the publication of my latest book, 21st Century Guide to Individual Skill Development. I tired of writing basketball/coaching books and decided to take a stab at fiction. I have written most of a pilot for a TV show, a reality TV show proposal, a documentary proposal, and have worked as a writer and researcher on another documentary. I also started an additional screenplay and a novel, in addition to beginning  another instructional book. Consequently, I read more fiction and books on writing than I did basketball, strength & conditioning, or training books. Read more

My 2015 Reading List

Last year, I produced a list of the best books that I read in 2014, inspired by Verb Gambetta, and throughout the year, I have been asked for book recommendations (Of course, my first recommendations are the four books that I wrote in 2015: Fake Fundamentals, SABA: The Antifragile Offense, Fake Fundamentals Volume 2, and 21st Century Guide to Individual Skill Development). This year, I decided to publish the list prematurely in the event that people needed a Christmas present for their favorite coach, parent of an athlete, or athlete. Read more

My 2014 Reading List

Inspired by Vern Gambetta, I decided to put together a link of the relevant books that I read throughout 2014. Because I spent the first half of the year making five-hour bus trips for games nearly every Saturday, I had a chance to read a decent number of books this year (although nothing like Coach Gambetta), many of which contributed to my free weekly newsletter. The list is loosely in the order in which I recommend the books to a coach, although everyone’s interests differ. Enjoy. Read more

The 21st Century Basketball Practice

21st Century Front Cover

The game of basketball has evolved over the last generation, but basketball practices have changed very little during my 30 years in the game as a player, coach, clinician, and consultant. Today’s game more closely resembles the game that we played on the playground than the one that we were taught in practices. The 21st Century Basketball Practice is an attempt to modernize the youth and high-school basketball and catch up to the evolution of the game. Read more

Press Release: The 21st Century Basketball Practice

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Brian McCormick, (916) 628-5134

Email: info@180shooter.com

PROFESSIONAL BASKETBALL COACH WRITES THE BOOK ON BASKETBALL PRACTICE

“Tremendous amounts of learning occurred on the playgrounds and during pickup games for people of a certain generation, and players today often miss this learning to attend organized practices or sessions with a skill trainer. The 21st Century Basketball Practice attempts to reincorporate this learning that once occurred in unstructured settings.”

LAS VEGAS, NEW MEXICO, November 12, 2014 – Basketball has evolved over the last 30 years, but basketball practices have hardly changed, despite the increasing interest, research, and technology. Professional basketball coach Brian McCormick, Ph.D. (University of Utah, 2013) has combined his practical experience coaching everything from CYO to European professional basketball with his educational experience to produce a book that explains a modern approach to the basketball practice.

Rather than view the team as controlled from the top down by a coach pulling the strings, The 21st Century Basketball Practice approaches the team and the game as a dynamic system, like a swarm of bees, and uses a constraints-led approach to coaching and teaching skills. Whereas the traditional approach to coaching separates skills into blocks of shooting, passing, dribbling, and more, The 21st Century approach teaches through the game by manipulating the tasks. This approach maintains the important perception-action coupling that is vital to the execution of skills in a game.

Based on the latest research from motor learning and sports psychology, The 21st Century Basketball Practice is a practical book. Rather than list drills, it explains how to create drills to solve specific problems that may arise for a coach or team. Through this approach, the number of drills is limited only by the coach’s imagination. It addresses what to do and what to say at practice. The purpose is to demonstrate an approach that promotes better performance in games.

The 21st Century Basketball Practice is McCormick’s 17th book for basketball coaches. His books have been purchased in more than 40 countries. To purchase The 21st Century Basketball Practice, go here for Amazon Kindle, here for paperback, and here for an e-book (PDF).

McCormick is available for interviews and appearances. For booking presentations, media appearances, interviews, and/or book-signings contact info@180shooter.com.

Developing Basketball Intelligence – An Amazing Book

I received the following email this morning:

Coach B.

I have to say that DBI is the best book I have ever read about coaching basketball.  As a result of your book I have focused on teaching a few things such as ball handling, layups, spacing and defensive principals.  My team has taken off.  In the past our schools kids have been knocked around, but this year they are playing with more intelligence and savvy.

Dave

After a reply in which I thanked Dave and asked if I could share his email, he replied:

Sure thing.  You can definitely use me as a testimonial.  My name is David Lerch. Just so you know, our team over the last two years is 2-25.  This year 4 games in we are 3-1 and our 5th and 6th graders who feed into the 7th and 8th grade team are 2-2 and playing really hard.  Teams don’t want to play us this year.  We have had two drops for next year.

Developing Basketball Intelligence is available as a paperback through lulu.com.

Also, for coaches looking to put Developing Basketball Intelligence into action, Playmakers Basketball Development Leagues feature a six-week, 12-session curriculum based on the concepts in DBI, and each participant receives a copy of Playmakers: The Player’s Guide to Developing Basketball Intelligence which is the player’s version of DBI.

Cross Over: The New Model of Youth Basketball Development Book Reviews

On Amazon.com, I saw the following two reviews of Cross Over: The New Model of Youth Basketball Development:

Ross Cronshaw:

Brian McCormick’s books have completely changed the way I coach basketball. The systematic way he builds through age groups, providing detailed research to back himself up, is great. He is also not afraid to take established basketball concepts and ask “Why do we do it this way, would it not make more sense to do it another way”?, and actually backs it up with some logical concepts of his own is inspirational.

I have this book, plus most of Brian’s other books, and use them at every training I do, from 4 year olds to men’s teams, and have had great success so far. No other author has changed my opinions as much, I am definately part of the “Crossover Movement”.

Pat Flanders:

This is the single best resource for youth basketball coaches. McCormick is unique in that he frames his philosophy of coaching basketball around the larger issues of youth athletic development, developing in kids a solid foundation of fundamentals, and recognizing that becoming an excellent basketball player involves a whole lot more than just one-on-one moves. The book gives concrete examples of drills for different ages and skill levels, but behind all of this is his research and well-developed opinions on how to help kids grow in ways that are appropriate for their age and development level. i’m a youth basketball coach and am frustrated by the number of people who call themselves coaches, but want nothing more than to create petri dishes that grow individual superstars. McCormick’s book takes into account the game of basketball and how developing as a player requires understanding the game, having skills that are not just basketball-related, and the fact that there’s no point in doing any of this if the kids aren’t enjoying it.

Cross Over: The New Model of Youth Basketball Development is available through Lulu.com.

Praise for Cross Over The New Model of Youth Basketball Development

I received this email this week about Cross Over: The New Model of Youth Basketball Development:

Coach,

I just finished reading the Third Edition of your book. I am an NSCA certified strength and conditioning coach, and a former collegiate strength coach.  I left the field to become a PE teacher in a stable job environment to raise my children. I am very impressed with the book.

I am in my fourth year of coaching 5th & 6th grade basketball, and I never played basketball in an organized setting.  I have had to learn a lot. Your book has been great.  It has convinced and challenged me about the way I have been coaching, and it has shed a lot of light on strength and conditioning with this age group.

I am confident you have authored the single most important book ever written on basketball and athletic development, and I have read many.

Thank you,

Tavis, Arkansas

Cross Over is available as a paperback through Lulu.com or Amazon.com.

Hard2Guard Player Development Newsletter, Vol. 4 Links

Issue 2

How to Juggle

Issue 3

Woodward focuses on ‘extra 1%’ with enlistment of vision expert from World Cup staff

Tyreke Evans’ Euro-Step

Tyreke Evans’ Stride-Stop

Issue 4

Long-term Athlete Development: Trainability in childhood and adolescence, windows of opportunity, optimal trainability

Finishing what he starts – Brooks gets tricky to score around much bigger players

Issue 5

How nerves affect soccer penalty kicks

Issue 6

No More Drills, Feedback or Technical Training…

Steve Nash vs. the regular ol’ layup

The Art of a Beautiful Game: The Thinking Fan’s Tour of the NBA (Sports Illustrated)

Issue 7

Self-Monitoring, Human Nature, and Sustained Learning

Issue 8

Eye-Training Video

Issue 9

The two faces of perfectionism

Hip Mobility

Squat Progression

Issue 10

Ice Skater Drill

Curry’s imaginative finishers grabbing attention

The Rondo

Issue 11

Arsene Wenger: ‘Am I too intelligent to be a football manager? You can never be intelligent enough’

Issue 12

Keith D’Amelio videos

Issue 13

Stability, Sport, and Performance Movement: Great Technique Without Injury

Hare Brain, Tortoise Mind: How Intelligence Increases When You Think Less

Developing Sport Expertise: Researchers and Coaches put Theory into Practice

Issue 14

The Art of Learning: An Inner Journey to Optimal Performance

Issue 18

Secrets of Soviet Sports Fitness and Training

Break the Ice

Don’t Ice That Ankle Sprain-with 43 min DVD (Sprain- The F.A.S.T. Approach to Preventing and Treating Sprained Ankles, volume 1)

Issue 19

Performance Assessment for Field Sports

Issue 20

How to Shoot a Floater

Stephen Curry’s The Rondo

Rajon Rondo’s Euro-Step

Issue 21

Harvard Tennis and the High Set

Valgus, varus or neutral knees?

Issue 22

Rear-Foot Elevated Split Squat

Valgus Overload

Exercise Bands

Issue 24

Coconut Water

Seven Behaviors of Successful Athletes

Sports Genes

Nideffer

Issue 25

Mike Roll and Leg Strength

How to Train like a World Cup Player

Mirror Drill

Issue 26

Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

Issue 30

Reading the Play in Team Sports

Issue 31

Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work

Vitamin Water

Issue 32

Myth of Core Stability

Energy Drinks

Issue 33

Team USA article

Blitz Basketball

Organized Streetball

Issue 34

Suzanne Farrell

Land on your ties, save your knees

UCD study

Issue 35

Free Throw Shooting Technique

Efficiency and the Mid-Range Shot

Issue 37

Sports Personality Position Theory

A Multidimensional Approach to Skilled Perception and Performance in Sport

Identification of non-specific tactical tasks in invasion games

Issue 38

Russell Westbrook

Crossover Step

Defensive Footwork Drills

Issue 39

Anticipation in a real-world task

Issue 40

Benefits of weight lifting for kids

Issue 41

Inside the brain of an elite athlete

Issue 42

The Fighter’s Mind: Inside the Mental Game

Hard2Guard Player Development Newsletters, Volume 4 Links

Issue 2

How to Juggle

Issue 3

Woodward focuses on ‘extra 1%’ with enlistment of vision expert from World Cup staff

Tyreke Evans’ Euro-Step

Tyreke Evans’ Stride-Stop

Issue 4

Long-term Athlete Development: Trainability in childhood and adolescence, windows of opportunity, optimal trainability

Finishing what he starts – Brooks gets tricky to score around much bigger players

Issue 5

How nerves affect soccer penalty kicks

Issue 6

No More Drills, Feedback or Technical Training…

Steve Nash vs. the regular ol’ layup

The Art of a Beautiful Game: The Thinking Fan’s Tour of the NBA (Sports Illustrated)

Issue 7

Self-Monitoring, Human Nature, and Sustained Learning

Issue 8

Eye-Training Video

Issue 9

The two faces of perfectionism

Hip Mobility

Squat Progression

Issue 10

Ice Skater Drill

Curry’s imaginative finishers grabbing attention

The Rondo

Issue 11

Arsene Wenger: ‘Am I too intelligent to be a football manager? You can never be intelligent enough’

Issue 12

Keith D’Amelio videos

Issue 13

Stability, Sport, and Performance Movement: Great Technique Without Injury

Hare Brain, Tortoise Mind: How Intelligence Increases When You Think Less

Developing Sport Expertise: Researchers and Coaches put Theory into Practice

Issue 14

The Art of Learning: An Inner Journey to Optimal Performance

Issue 18

Secrets of Soviet Sports Fitness and Training

Break the Ice

Don’t Ice That Ankle Sprain-with 43 min DVD (Sprain- The F.A.S.T. Approach to Preventing and Treating Sprained Ankles, volume 1)

Issue 19

Performance Assessment for Field Sports

Issue 20

How to Shoot a Floater

Stephen Curry’s The Rondo

Rajon Rondo’s Euro-Step

Issue 21

Harvard Tennis and the High Set

Valgus, varus or neutral knees?

Issue 22

Rear-Foot Elevated Split Squat

Valgus Overload

Exercise Bands

Issue 24

Coconut Water

Seven Behaviors of Successful Athletes

Sports Genes

Nideffer

Issue 25

Mike Roll and Leg Strength

How to Train like a World Cup Player

Mirror Drill

Issue 26

Drive: The Surprising Truth About What Motivates Us

Issue 30

Reading the Play in Team Sports

Issue 31

Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work

Vitamin Water

Issue 32

Myth of Core Stability

Energy Drinks

Issue 33

Team USA article

Blitz Basketball

Organized Streetball

Issue 34

Suzanne Farrell

Land on your ties, save your knees

UCD study

Issue 35

Free Throw Shooting Technique

Efficiency and the Mid-Range Shot

Issue 37

Sports Personality Position Theory

A Multidimensional Approach to Skilled Perception and Performance in Sport

Identification of non-specific tactical tasks in invasion games

Issue 38

Russell Westbrook

Crossover Step

Defensive Footwork Drills

Issue 39

Anticipation in a real-world task

Issue 40

Benefits of weight lifting for kids

Issue 41

Inside the brain of an elite athlete

Issue 42

The Fighter’s Mind: Inside the Mental Game

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